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Re-Introducing Grains After GAPS

Re-Introducing Grains After GAPS

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I have begun re-introducing the first recommended grains by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride when transitioning off the GAPS diet. I have introduced fermented buckwheat and fermented quinoa.

I would like to share with you the delicious recipes I have tried. I introduced buckwheat first and tried Chris Kresser’s sourdough buckwheat pancakes. My wonderful sweet boyfriend (also my camera man) made these for me :).

Here is the recipe if you would like to try it. It is very simple to make, it just takes a little planning and waiting. By the end of day 2 of fermentation, the dough is bubbling!! This means that it is “alive!” Most of the food Americans eat is “dead.” It is important that all of us eat fermented foods for good health. The pancakes were cooked in coconut oil and were topped with maple syrup. I washed them down with a tall glass of raw milk.

Last week I begin introducing fermented quinoa. Here are a couple ways I enjoyed my quinoa:

Quinoa "Oatmeal"
 
Author:
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Pour 1 cup organic quinoa into a glass bowl or jar and cover with filtered water
  2. Add 1 tbsp acidic medium such as raw apple cider vinegar, lemon juice, yogurt, whey or kefir (I used apple cider vinegar)
  3. Cover and let sit for 12 to 24 hours (I let mine sit for about 36 since I forgot about it, but it is even better since it fermented for a longer period of time)
  4. Strain liquid and rinse with filtered water until the water runs clear (I noticed before and after straining my grains were crackling – I think this is another sign they are “alive.” I also noticed I had sprouts coming out of many of the grains!)
  5. Put grains into pot and add 1 cup of filtered water and a pinch of unrefined sea salt.
  6. Bring to a boil then set heat to low, cover the pot and let it simmer for 15 minutes. At the end of this time you should see holes in the quinoa, like when you cook rice and it is ready. Let sit for 5 minutes.
  7. Add toppings on the hot quinoa
  8. Serve or incorporate into another recipe.

 
Quinoa n’ Eggs Hash:
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 1 cup organic Quinoa
  • Grass fed butter
  • 2 pasture raised eggs
  • Unrefined sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Organic chopped garlic
  • Organic chopped green onions
  • Organic vegetables of choice, chopped into bite size pieces
Instructions
  1. Pour 1 cup organic quinoa into a glass bowl or jar and cover with filtered water
  2. Add 1 tbsp acidic medium such as raw apple cider vinegar, lemon juice, yogurt, whey or kefir (I used apple cider vinegar)
  3. Cover and let sit for 12 to 24 hours (I let mine sit for about 36 since I forgot about it, but it is even better since it fermented for a longer period of time)
  4. Strain liquid and rinse with filtered water until the water runs clear (I noticed before and after straining my grains were crackling – I think this is another sign they are “alive.” I also noticed I had sprouts coming out of many of the grains!)
  5. Put grains into pot and add 1 cup of filtered water and a pinch of unrefined sea salt.
  6. Bring to a boil then set heat to low, cover the pot and let it simmer for 15 minutes. At the end of this time you should see holes in the quinoa, like when you cook rice and it is ready. Let sit for 5 minutes.
  7. Add butter or healthy saturated fat or oil of choice to a hot pan.
  8. Whisk 2 pastured eggs in a bowl and add to hot pan with cooked quinoa.
  9. Add unrefined sea salt, freshly ground black pepper, garlic and any other spice of choice to pan.
  10. Cook everything until eggs are no longer runny.
  11. Optional: add other vegetables like carrots, onions, garlic, green onions, etc. Let the sky be your limit!
  12. Enjoy!

 

It is hard to say which of these recipes I enjoyed more. The quinoa was almost like eating oatmeal again, and I loved the creaminess, the sweetness of the maples syrup and the spice of cinnamon. The quinoa n’ eggs hash was also great because it was a more satisfying breakfast than just fried eggs.

Remember when eating grains, beans, nuts and seeds, it is vital to soak, sprout and/or ferment them to enjoy the benefits of maximum nutrition and nutrient absorption. Grains especially have a plethora of anti-nutrients in them.

Preparing these plant foods traditionally will ensure that we absorb the nutrients the plants offer. This week I plan on introducing fermented millet. Watch for a post on my experience with introducing it and a recipe!

 

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